Gaming

All the Final Fantasy Games for Mobiles, Part 2: The Spinoffs

In case you chose to read this article first instead of Part 1, let’s do a little introduction again. Final Fantasy is a series of role-playing games created by Square Enix (formerly Square). It has numerous games under its belt that spans different gaming systems from the SNES to the first PlayStation to the Nintendo DS. The main games in the series are typically depicted in roman numerals, with XV soon to be the latest installment later this year.

Thanks to the success of the main games, Square Enix was able to venture outside its comfort zone and into the world of spinoffs, prequels, and sequels. There are a number of these available for mobiles, too, similar with the main games. Let’s take a look at each of them so you can finally decide which Final Fantasy game to dive into first.

Final Fantasy IV: The After Years

Square Enix
Square Enix

This game is the only prequel/sequel in the list, so at least that makes it unique in its own right. Final Fantasy IV: The After Years is set 17 years after the original game and features the same characters along with their descendants. The gameplay is also very similar to Final Fantasy IV, so if you played the first game you’re going to similarly like this game. Well, unless repetitiveness isn’t your thing because, really, Final Fantasy IV: The After Years feels way too similar as the first game.

Final Fantasy Dimensions

Google Play
Google Play

If you liked the 16-bit era Final Fantasy games, then Final Fantasy Dimensions will charm you. The game features many elements from said Final Fantasy games, such as the Active Time Battle system from Final Fantasy IV and the job class system from Final Fantasy V. Unlike the games it is paying homage to, Final Fantasy Dimensions plays out in episodic format, with different party members each time.

Final Fantasy Tactics: War of the Lions

Google Play
Google Play

Final Fantasy Tactics: War of the Lions is not only the best non-main Final Fantasy game available for mobiles, it is also one of the best games of all time – regardless of gaming platform and genre. The game is a turn-based strategy game instead of the usual role-playing game, but it features a lot of gameplay aspects from the main Final Fantasy games. Most prominently, the job class system that can easily burn 10 hours of your playing time. However, the game’s biggest highlight is its captivating story that even rivals modern games today. Actually, Final Fantasy Tactics: War of the Lions is better than most games today, story-wise.

Final Fantasy: Brave Exvius

Google Play
Google Play

Thanks to a collaborated effort by its two publishers, Final Fantasy: Brave Exvius draws its elements from two fronts – the Final Fantasy games and Brave Frontier. The latter is most prominent in the game’s simple battle system that mainly requires touch controls. Almost everything else is borrowed from the former, with the exception of your ability to summon characters from the Final Fantasy series.

Final Fantasy Record Keeper

Google Play
Google Play

To be blunt, Final Fantasy Record Keeper is a heavy dose of fan service. The game simply revolves around re-visiting locations and scenarios from the main Final Fantasy games complete with their respective characters. Only play this game after you’re finished with most, if not all, the main Final Fantasy games. Because you might find the game very hard to appreciate if you went in blind, so to speak.

Final Fantasy All the Bravest

Google Play
Google Play

Final Fantasy All the Bravest, simply put, is just like Final Fantasy Record Keeper and Final Fantasy: Brave Exvius in that it features numerous characters and gameplay features from other games in the series – with heavy emphasis on characters. However, this game is without a doubt the most lackluster of the three, so do yourself a favor and only touch this game if you still haven’t had your fill of the two other games. Final Fantasy All the Bravest simply doesn’t have anything significant to show.

Theatrhythm Final Fantasy

iTunes
iTunes

If you like Final Fantasy and rhythm games like DJ Hero and Rock Band, then Theatrhythm Final Fantasy is a match-made-in-heaven for you. The game features a rhythm gameplay that incorporates your favorite characters and tunes from the main Final Fantasy games. The series’ music is one of the best in the business – most especially the pieces crafted by Nobuo Uematsu, so do yourself a favor and treat your ears to it. If role-playing games aren’t really your thing because of their perceived slow-pace, then perhaps the faster pace of Theatrhythm Final Fantasy will suit you.

Final Fantasy Airborne Brigade

Google Play
Google Play

(NOTE: It seems the North American version is no longer available. Link and image is for the Japan release, which is titled as Final Fantasy Brigade.)

Because they are typically played in single-player, Final Fantasy games can sometimes be a lonely affair. Even if you’re completely hooked to the story, it’s hard not to feel like you’re alone in the game. Well, say hello to Final Fantasy Airborne Brigade. This game incorporates many elements from other Final Fantasy games, like job classes, airships, and summoned monsters. The only difference is that you can now enjoy all of them with real-life friends in a multiplayer environment.

Mobius Final Fantasy

Square Enix
Square Enix

Mobius Final Fantasy is the most recent game in this list, so it’s no surprise if you’ve already heard of it. Despite its shiny graphics borne from the advancements in technology, the game is really just a simple Final Fantasy game at heart. It heavily borrows elements from other main Final Fantasy games, like the job system and the usual level-up system. And although they’re used differently, summoned monsters are in the game, too. The most notable difference is that you can only control one character in the game.

The “Other” Games: Spinoffs Edition

Some of the non-main Final Fantasy mobile games that are not yet available for the iOS and Android for specific reasons include Before Crisis: Final Fantasy VII (Japan only), Dirge of Cerberus Lost Episode: Final Fantasy VII (not available for iOS and Android), and the two sequels to Final Fantasy XIII (Japan only). However, only the latter is especially noteworthy.

Hopefully, you have now chosen which Final Fantasy game to start off with. If you want to try all of them, it’s a good bet to start with the main games first according to their numbered order, although you might want to play Final Fantasy Tactics: War of the Lions as soon as possible, too. Then follow that up with either Final Fantasy VI or IX. But seriously, the choice is yours.

Tags : AndroidFinal Fantasyfinal fantasy gamesfinal fantasy mobileiOSrpgsquare enix
John

The author John

A part-time contributor, John produces content aimed at both gamers and game developers.

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